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Not Suitable for Family Viewing

TitleNot Suitable for Family Viewing
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsGrant, Vicki
Volume1st
Number of Pages289
PublisherHarperTrophyCanada
CityToronto
DescriptorsEnglish Language; Families; Nova Scotia; Novel; Realism
Abstract

This teen novel tells the story of Robin Schwartz

Jurisdiction

Nova Scotia

Age Range

12-16

Record Editor

James Langer

Overview: 

     Not Suitable for Public Viewing is a young adult mystery novel, ideal for middle to older teen readers. Told in first person from the point of view of Robin Schwartz, the novel touches on themes of trust, bravery, and self-esteem. Other themes include coming-of-age and family loyalty.
     As the teenage daughter of renowned talk show host Mimi Schwartz, Robin has everything she needs – except for friends, motivation, or self-esteem. She also misses the close relationship she and her mother used to share. When Robin accidentally discovers a rare childhood photo of Mimi, accompanied by a high school hockey ring, she begins to get curious about her mother’s hidden past. Robin shakes off her apathy and embarks on a secret detective mission that leads her away from the safety of New York, into the unfamiliar world of Port Minton, rural Nova Scotia. She soon learns that Mimi has been anything but transparent about her childhood. As Robin works to unravel the mystery of her mother’s past, she is aided (and thwarted) by various local characters, including Kay the hostel-keeper, the backwater Embree Bister, and Opal Hiltz, Port Minton’s resident do-gooder. Most importantly for Robin, however, is Levi: the first boy she ever kisses.
 

Quotation: 

     Port Minton back then did look sort of quaint, I guess. The houses were painted up and there were boats in the harbour. Old guys in plaid shirts and big rubber boots sat around the dock apparently mending their nets. According to a sign, you could get an order of fish and chips for $1.75.
     I almost flip right past the next page, until I notice the name Ingram. There’s a photo of an old general store – no doubt the one Levi told me about. Mr. Ingram himself is standing behind the long wooden counter wearing one of those white aprons. He’s even got little black bands on his arms to keep his sleeves out of the way. (Did he really dress like that or was this some costume the photographer dreamed up?)
      I stare at the picture. Is this Rosie’s dad?
      If so, does that make him my grandfather?
      I realize the only thing I know for sure is that Mom’s lying. She’s lying all over the place. So what’s true? Do I believe her – or do I believe enoughaboutmimi.com? Are they both lying? My brain creaks. This is like one of those Mindblower puzzles – and I hate that stupid game. There’s always some catch that no normal person could possibly have figured out. Somehow – like, discreetly – I’ve got to find out more about Rosie. Somebody around here must know what happened to her.
      I put down the magazine and stare into space. I’m thinking so hard I don’t even notice when Levi walks in.